Irvine Welsh

A creative force of modern literature, Irvine Welsh is a prolific novelist and short-story writer, whose debut Trainspotting (1993) was turned into a film in 1996. While the novel and its follow-ups remain high-profile as they develop the lives of the main characters, his parallel work is both expansive and dynamic. Myriad successes include Marabou Stork Nightmares, Glue and Filth.

 

Irvine’s writing first appeared in the small-press scene, most notably through Duncan McLean’s Clocktower Press and Rebel Inc magazine, the latter edited by Kevin Williamson. He was part of a small group of Scottish writers who would go on to reshape the country’s literature, along with McLean and Alan Warner.

 

Irvine is also a respected acid-house DJ, director and writer for film and television, and someone who has travelled extensively for work and for pleasure. He currently lives between the UK and the US, and his work and its themes have long been sources of inspiration for new writers emerging from the rank and file. He cites his interests as love, life and laughter.